On the 14th of April 2018, the United States of America, together with the United Kingdom and France, led an airstrike on the town of Douma, Syria, based on a supposed chemical attack that happened a week earlier.

A young boy, living a normal life, in a normal household, loses all of his family members; he instantly becomes an orphan. His family members being another few numbers added to the total count of casualties; overlooked. This boy grows up with burning resentment and hatred towards the allies that killed his family, and destroyed his country.

15 years later, this man bombs a train station in the United Kingdom. Would this have happened if this man grew up somewhere else? Somewhere where he was surrounded by his family, in an area with no violence. Would it be so wrong to assume that this man grew up to be a terrorist?

Take a minute to really think about it. Imagine growing up in an environment where you are constantly under the danger of being attacked, not only by the violent organizations living near you, but by the superpowers overseas, those who can cause truly copious amounts of damage. Imagine growing up seeing the true effects these superpowers are having on your country, the fact that their constant intervening is doing more harm than they could ever anticipate.

Now you might say that these allies are doing at least some good by fighting these terrorist organizations in the Middle East, but the reality that Arabs as a collective realize is that they would be so much better off without the unnecessarily violent foreign intervention. It’s safe to say that the United States are basically toying with the Middle East. Funding a terrorist group, then funding another terrorist group to get rid of the first one, then another, and then another. It’s a cycle majorly influenced by forces outside of the Arab world.

As a society, we need to stop and think about these air strikes. How do they help the countries being attacked Could there be any hidden motive? Of course there is. Should we believe the superpowers when they continue they claim that they fight for the greater good? That they fight and kill for peace? The more questions we ask, the more possibilities there are for us to imagine. Are they aware of their “terrorist making” effect? Is it what they want?

“No legacy is so rich as honesty.”

My name is Sadeen Qardan. I am from the capital city in Jordan; Amman. I am a first year student in Global Governance hoping to pursue a career in either social justice or humanitarian aid. I am strongly driven by my passion to do things the ethical way, to be true to my goals, and to implement change where change is needed.

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