The Nazi Concentration camps were considered the epitome of mercilessness, the farthest we’ve been from our humanity. We all look back at that time with a lot of questions on how any human can be capable of such a discrimination, how anyone would be prepared to torture someone because of their religion or race. We reassure ourselves that we will never go back to these actions, that we’ve learnt and grown past these eras of blatant oppression.

We are better people now.

What we don’t realize is that these concentration camps didn’t die. Many of them still exist, particularly those in China, aimed at detaining and “correcting” muslims of their religious habits, specifically in the Xinjiang area. Around a million muslims are held today in these camps, making it the largest detainment facility of a minority population in today’s world. These muslims are forced to drink alcohol and consume pork, two acts completely forbidden by the Muslim religion. If anyone were to refuse the consumption of pork or alcohol, they would be whipped, starved or tortured by solitary confinement. Muslim women are forced into marrying Chinese men without their consent. The aim of these practices are to rid these Muslims of their beliefs and make them the “ideal citizen”, calling it “transformation through education”.

Journalists from The Independent have asked for a comment from the Chinese authorities regarding this matter. The authorities continue to state that they are unaware of such camps. However, as Affinity Magazine states: they have been previously quoted for declaring that there needs to be some sort of religious transformation in the region in order to combat Muslim extremists (the Militant Muslim Uyghurs), who killed thousands of people in that area in the past recent years.

While the authorities’ concerns of the religious extremism are valid. Isn’t there a better way to combat this issue? Is there a more logical answer than detaining and torturing a million people?

“No legacy is so rich as honesty.”

My name is Sadeen Qardan. I am from the capital city in Jordan; Amman. I am a first year student in Global Governance hoping to pursue a career in either social justice or humanitarian aid. I am strongly driven by my passion to do things the ethical way, to be true to my goals, and to implement change where change is needed.

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