Ana Carolina Marcondes

I was born in the triple border of Brazil with Paraguay and Argentina, in 1996. Since childhood, I realized that the world we live in is not the same for everyone. Therefore, I am currently in the second year of the B.A. in Global Governance at the University of Rome Tor Vergata to learn how we can change this scenario to provide an environment where individuals can be themselves without fear and with similar opportunities. Personally, I believe we are here to grow and be useful to our community. I hope to spend my life acting to leave this place better than it was when I arrived.

The EU and African Union security-development nexus: a new shape of cooperation or dependence?

Introduction After centuries of exploitation and a relationship marked by asymmetries, to overcome the North-South dependence relation, the European Union has sought to shift this conception through translating development funds into security interests, upon supporting African-led security governance under the scope of the African Peace and Security Architecture, the cornerstone… Read More »The EU and African Union security-development nexus: a new shape of cooperation or dependence?

The fatality of lack of Governance: Paraguay vs. Brazil

Paraguay is a small Latin American country bordering Brazil, Argentina and Bolivia. My grandparents were forced to flee on exile from Alfredo Stroessner’s dictatorship in the beginning of the 1960’s. They settled in the triple border of Brazil with Argentina and Paraguay, called Foz do Iguaçu (Iguassu Falls), my hometown.… Read More »The fatality of lack of Governance: Paraguay vs. Brazil

Access to Justice for Women: customary and informal justice systems

On October 8th and 9th I had the pleasure to attend the Expert Group Meeting on “Women, Legal Pluralism, Customary and Informal Justice Systems” at the International Development Law Organization’s office at The Hague, Netherlands. I was invited to attend by Prof. Hauwa Ibrahim, our Human Rights professor at Global… Read More »Access to Justice for Women: customary and informal justice systems